Bierocks

Standard

bierockss 23/06/2017

Bierocks are made with a yeasted dough to form a pastry casing for a savoury filling of meat and cabbage and originating from Eastern Europe.

Ever in search of new ways with mince, this recipe also provides an interesting, tasty and cheap combination of ingredients that also provide a hand held snack that pairs perfectly with a cold beer. Winner!

Makes 12

Ingredients:

Bread Dough:

  • 500g strong white flour
  • 1 7g sachet fast action yeast
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 100ml whole milk
  • 100ml hot water

Filling:

  • 500g lean beef mince
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1 small Savoy cabbage, finely shredded
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • grated Parmesan cheese (optional)

Method:

Make the bread dough:

  1. Put the flour, yeast, egg, salt and sugar into a bowl.
  2. Add the hot water to the milk and add gradually to the mixture until it comes together into a soft dough. You may need more liquid, depending on the moisture in the flour and egg.
  3. Knead the mixture for ten minutes, cover and set aside to rise for an hour.

Make the filling:

  1. Heat a non-stick saucepan over a medium high heat and crumble in the meat. No need to have any oil, even lean mince has a certain amount of fat in it which will come out as the meat cooks.
  2. Stir the meat around until it is browned and shiny.
  3. Add the onion and continue stirring while the onion softens.
  4. Finally add in the cabbage and cook until the cabbage has softened – probably no more than 2-3 minutes.
  5. Stir in the salt and pepper, remove from the heat and set aside to cool.
  6. When the dough has risen, tip out and pat down.
  7. Divide dough into pieces weighing 75-80g.
  8. Roll dough out into a 15cm square.
  9. Put a large tablespoon of the cooled filling into the middle of the dough.
  10. Add 1 teaspoon of the grated cheese, if using.
  11. Bring the corners of the dough together and pinch along the edges to seal in the filling. What you will end up with looks like the back of an envelope.
  12. Turn the buns over and place onto a parchment-lined baking sheet.
  13. Dust the buns with flour and set aside to rise for 15-20 minutes.
  14. Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C Fan.
  15. Bake the buns for 15-20 minutes until lightly browned.
  16. Remove the buns from the oven and immediately cover the baking sheet with some tea-towels. This will trap the heat and create steam, which will soften the crust of the buns.
  17. Eat warm.

bierocks

Advertisements

Barbari Bread

Standard

IMG_20151025_072900[1] 25/10/2015

Some meals just demand bread. For me, the idea of a barbecue without bread is like a celebration without champagne. Bread has the ability to “wrap” and hold the flavours and juices of grilled vegetables and meats so well: very helpful when the dry heat of the grill or oven has evaporated moisture from the flesh. To counteract that, the use of a sauce, such as yoghurt and mint, plus a swaddling with a bread wrap will rescue your meat or veg from drying further.

This is a long dimpled spongey flatbread that’s a little like Iranian barbari bread. I’ve packed it with yoghurt to boost the flavour, helping it to colour ultra-fast in the oven and so keeping it soft. Give yourself 2-3 hours and drape a dry cloth over it while it cools to keep it soft.

Makes 2 large flatbreads.

Ingredients:

  • 175g low-fat yoghurt
  • 250ml warm water
  • 7g sachet fast-action yeast
  • 400g strong white flour
  • 100g wholemeal or spelt flour
  • 2 tsp salt
  • Olive oil, for kneading and shaping
  • Nigella seeds, to finish

Method:

  1. Put the yoghurt in a bowl, add the warm water (very warm if the yoghurt is fridge-cold) and stir until smooth. Mix in the yeast, then let it sit for a few minutes to dissolve.
  2. Add the two flours and salt, then mix evenly to a very sticky dough. Cover the bowl, leave for 10 minutes then rub oil on a worktop and scrape the dough out on to it. Oil your hands well, then fold the dough in on itself about 6-8 times and put it back in the bowl, cover and leave for 30 minutes.
  3. Oil the worktop again, lift the dough on to it then dimple it out into a rectangle. Fold the dough in by thirds then place it back in the bowl. After another 30 minutes, repeat this stretch and fold, then return the dough to the bowl and leave for another 30 minutes.
  4. Place the dough back on the oiled worktop and with a dimpling action stretch it out into a rectangle. Cut the dough in half then fold the edges of each dough piece inward so they form neat rectangles. Line a baking tray with non-stick paper, then flip the dough pieces on to it so they sit side by side. Don’t worry that they don’t fill the tray yet as we’ll fix that later. Leave the dough uncovered for 30 minutes, and heat the oven to 180C fan.
  5. To bake, stretch the dough pieces out by getting your fingers right underneath each rectangle and pulling them outwards. Oil the top of the dough, and run 3 or 4 fingers over the length of each rectangle so grooves form, then sprinkle lightly with seeds. Leave to rise another 15 minutes then bake for about 25 minutes until golden.
  6. To serve, leave to cool then slice the dough lengthways and serve with grilled meat and a little yoghurt mixed with fresh chopped mint.